Archive for the ‘Literacy’ Category

Class Seventeen – Students thinking about Text/Image Relationship


Today we began again with writing and adding detail. We wrote and then passed our work around so that we could read each others and ask questions. This worked well. Each person (myself included) got their work returned with questions from two people. Then we went back and answered the questions. I think that both Franklin and Adam realized that they were leaving things out that their reader wanted to know. Tomorrow, I’ll ask them to ask questions of their own writing and try to answer them. My goal is to show them, while getting feedback from someone is good, how they can work on adding details to their writing to make it more interesting.

The work on “A Circle of Friends” is going well. I printed out the text for each page last night and today the guys cut them out and figured out where on the page they should go. A couple will have to get formatted to fit in a tall narrow spot and three or four got split between two pages or split to go in different spots on the page. They decided that two should involve the font getting bigger to make the image of the words reflect the meaning of the words. It really showed that they were thinking about the text and the relationship it has with the images. I simply made changes to the digital copy, and asked one or two questions; they did the work and the thinking – SCORE!! I was starting to wonder if this project purpose had gotten lost. Today showed me that it wasn’t and in fact it was better than I’d hoped for.

Tomorrow will be the big push to get all the projects done. In addition to the aforementioned project, Adam is creating a fake Facebook wall and Franklin is performing his reading of “Falling Up” that we will record and show. I hope it can all get done!! Time has really flown for these seventeen classes, I can’t believe that after two more it will be over and I’ll have my Masters – SWEET!!

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Class Sixteen – Questions


Today was a day of questions.

We did some writing first thing, and will continue doing so Tuesday and Wednesday, and talked about how to write ‘more’. The strategy I focused most on was questions. What questions are your reader going to have for you after reading your piece? Have you answered the who/what/where/when/how questions? I asked them some questions about their writing and they asked me a question about mine and we went to work answering them. It went okay for the first day. We’ll see how it goes tomorrow, I’ll have them switch and ask each other questions about the writing. My hope is that they start to think about these questions as they write.

Then we transitioned into questions about reading, QAR (Question-Answer Relationships). The four levels of questions,

  1. Right There – The answer is right in the text, easy-peasy.
  2. Think and Search – The answer is in the text, but you’re going to have to hunt for it.
  3. Author and You – The answer is not in the story, you have to use what you learned from the text and what you know to answer.
  4. On Your Own – This question is related to the topic of the reading but you do not have to have read it to answer the question.

I gave out an organizer, and a sheet that provided clues within the format of the question that help to determine what type of question it is, thereby knowing what you need to do to answer it. Then we went online and took this four-question quiz that provided a text, a question and answer and asked what type of question it is. Adam zipped ahead through the quiz as I helped Franklin, who thought everything was a “Right There” question. We focused on the question being asked and where it could be found and then looked at the handouts. They both got 2/4 (but so did I when I went through it yesterday to check it out. Let me know how you do.).

Then I had questions for them about their text for “A Circle of Friends”. I asked them to check to see if the story and wording was the way they wanted and if the words matched the images. They made some good changes. Franklin became distracted though and began making up words (and definitions) that he wanted to include in the story. Adam thought they were funny but wasn’t about to let them into the story. I thought that it was funny too and was interested in the form the words were taking, most of them ended in “-ion” and the definitions made them nouns. I don’t think that he could have verbalized his reasoning but it is obvious that he’s internalized that. His definitions also sounded like definitions, there is a level of awareness in this as well.

The final questions came from me. When picking up Franklin, I was told that he wants Franklin to have homework, structure, like the other student he brings has. He said that making up words was silly and it wasn’t what he was paying the program for. I was not ready for this. The program doesn’t really talk about homework other than reading on their own, the other student that he mentioned was working on the summer reading assignment great for that student to have this time to work on it – not an option in my case, but also not required. In writing the case studies for both students (and at the end of each year of teaching) I look back and think “Boy I should have. . . ” “I could have. . . ” “I wish I . . . ” Having this interaction at the end of the day threw me. If this had happened during the school year I would have been in the mindset to handle this and defend Franklin’s progress and lauded his creativity and word sense. Even now, hours later, I am questioning not only how I handled it but the instruction that I’ve given Franklin. I know that I know what I’m doing though, I know that Franklin, in the very brief time we’ve had, has learned, his presentation of “Falling Up” is proof, the decisions that he’s making as a reader on how to present it orally are partially in result of work we’ve done together, I know I shouldn’t doubt myself but it isn’t always easy. The good thing (I think) is that we have parent/teacher conferences the next two days and I will be able to talk about all of Franklin’s strengths at that point.

I will always have those questions about how I could have done a better job on a lesson, a unit, or a conversation. This is different from doubting, I know that I do the best job that I can – but I want to be better. I think that is what good teachers do; they question everything with the intent to be better for our students. When a teacher decides that what they do is ‘good enough’ then they are no longer teachers. A teacher must continue to strive, to grow, to increase their knowledge – not just of their content but of teaching strategies and educational theory, and, most importantly, of their students – so that they avoid stagnation. Not the most appropriate simile, but teachers are like sharks – when they stop moving they die. Okay that is more dramatic than I was going for but I think it makes the point. Teachers aren’t just teachers, they must be students too.

Class Fifteen – Being a Coach


Today’s class focused on Literacy Leadership. Now I know you might be saying “Wait, weren’t the last Friday’s spent on that?” To which I’d reply “You’ve been reading my blog?!” Then I’d go on to explain that it is a big topic. Today the focus was on not students but colleagues. Being a resource for teachers regardless of title.

To coach is to convey a valued colleague from where he or she is to where he or she wants to be. – Art Costa

I’m not familiar with Costa (you can click his name above to go to his site) but Peter said that he is very careful about the words he chooses. He asked what stood out to us in this quote. To me it is what I emphasized with underline and bold. The goal of the coach isn’t to push or cajole someone to a place of the coaches choosing, it is to be a bridge to help them reach their goal. This bridge metaphor really resonates with me and I use it as an introduction on my resume website.

We discussed a few scenarios in class that made us think about how we would act in a coaching role and were given a prompt to respond to as homework. Here is the scenario to which I am to respond:

Lee has been teaching seventh grade Language Arts for fifteen years and completed his master’s degree in literacy three years ago. He provides reading and writing workshops for her students and differentiates according to their needs. His students are very successful.

Janet has been teaching seventh grade Language Arts for the same amount of time, but her students are not doing as well as others in her department. In fact, her students have made the least gains in seventh grade for several years in a row. She typically teacher with whole class novels.

At the weekly PLC meeting, Janet shares that she is frustrated by her students’ progress. She reaches out to the group for help. Lee is not the school’s literacy specialist, but he knows that his students are successful. He wants to help but is not sure how to go about it.

 

The questions I’m to answer are: What would you do if you were Lee? How would you act as a coach to support your colleague? Have you ever been in a similar situation? What did you do? How did it work out?

I’ll let you think about how you’d answer before sharing my own. . .

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Class Fourteen – Strategies and Presentation


It was just Franklin and I today. Adam was sick. On Monday we will have to spend a good chunk of time working on the text for A Circle of Friends.

We started with a strategy that was shared in our small group yesterday. It’s called “Somebody, Wanted, But, So” [Click here to see the organizer] It is a great strategy that can be used for a variety of purposes. We used it for summarizing. You start with a character [somebody] who wants something, but there is something in the way of it so this happens. I modeled it using the Lorax {The Lorax [somebody] wanted the Once-ler to stop cutting down truffela trees, but the Once-ler cut them all down, so the Lorax sent all the animals away and then left as well] and then Franklin did it with his own book. I also slipped in a discussion of conflict. The but points right to the conflict that the character is facing. We also used it for prediction with When you Reach Me, we haven’t finished it yet, which leaves the so as a perfect place for prediction. Franklin asked if he could take a blank graphic organizer home with him.

For the celebration next Thursday we’re going to present a video of Franklin’s dramatic reading of Shel Silverstein‘s Falling Up. We did a couple of practice takes today that went pretty well. Then we headed outside to practice the presentation. On the way down I mentioned the poetry warp activity that we had done on day nine (Day Nine – That goes in the Win column!). We talked about how different parts of the poem might be read differently (slower, louder, etc). Outside Franklin read through the poem in different ways. I pointed out lines that I liked his delivery of where he ignored the lack of punctuation and suggested a line where he might pay closer attention to the lack of punctuation and read through to the next line. He made a choice to say the word “Up”, which is repeated, louder and give it more emphasis. I was really pleased with how this went and am excited to work with him on this. He really seemed happy with how it was going too and said so when I asked him. I think that he understands how his delivery changes the feel of the poem and the poetry warp exercise put the choices he can make on the table for him. His presence as he is speaking the lines and the small movements he’s working into the delivery is really coming together and should make for a very entertaining presentation.

It was good to just have Franklin today, it gave me the opportunity to connect with him better. Adam had that chance earlier in the program and I’m glad that I was able to have that chance with Franklin too. Building personal relationships with students, getting to know them and letting them know you, is really important. If they don’t know that you are a sincere, caring, hilarious, knowledgeable, open, willing to learn from them person then you will add that to the challenges of teaching and learning.

Class Thirteen – Collaboration&Connections


We’ve reached a point where I’m able to refer back to things we’ve talked about: imagery, exploding the moment, making connections, visualizing, the relationship between words and images, etc – in relation to the work we’re doing now. It is satisfying to watch Adam and Franklin discuss if a page needs text or stands on its own, or if text on one page can cover two images and hear them reasoning it out and justifying it. Today they went through, looked at the notes I made for each of them, and took turns writing down the text for every other page of A Circle of Friends. They started out not really talking about it but as it became clear that they had to know what the other wrote they discussed what they wrote and made small changes as they went along. Tomorrow we’ll lay the text out and see what needs to be changed. I pointed out that they started in 3rd person, but Franklin began writing in 1st person. So, it flipped back and forth between 1st and 3rd. Adam thinks it sounds better in 1st, they’ll make that decision together tomorrow.

We started the day talking about storyboarding. I showed my example (Exploding!!!) that I wrote for EDU 566 and talked about that I didn’t have to storyboard but that it helped me pick a topic and to slow down a moment like we had talked about yesterday (Class Twelve – Progress). Then they tried it. I suggested things they could try based on previous things they wrote or to look back at the map we drew as a prompt. It was a bit of a struggle to get started but Adam chose a story he’d told me this morning about teaching a friend to dive and their subsequent belly flop. Franklin decided to make up a story but it was not as inventive as his usual stories. To do it again I would give him the opportunity to orally rehearse his story before having him represent it graphically. Once we had some pictures drawn we shared them and then I asked them to write based on the pictures, to slow time down and engage the readers’ senses. Adam got stuck on how to describe how the diving board moved and we sketched it out to try to figure out the best way to describe it. Franklin didn’t enjoy this; I suggested picking one of the squares from his storyboard and focusing on that. He tried but this just didn’t work for him. I’m okay with that though, each strategy doesn’t have to be a gem for every student. I’m just giving them tools to put into their tool box, maybe storyboarding will hang out at the bottom of the box and get dusty, but maybe one day he’ll find a need for it. The strategy worked well for Adam, he even went back to it while writing to figure out some details.

There isn’t much time left in the program, four more coaching day, six more days for me. I wasn’t sure what kind of impact I was going to make in such a short time but I do see it, it isn’t ginormous but it is there and with the four days left I know that the mini-lessons we’ve done will find a place in the projects we’re doing and find a solid home in their tool box.

Class Twelve – Progress


The interaction between Franklin and Adam has been an interesting thing to watch evolve. Yesterday Franklin wanted to go to the library, to which I said absolutely and made time for it. He picked out another Shel Silverstein book (Falling Up) and to my surprise Adam picked one out too (A Giraffe and a Half). Today Franklin read two poems aloud, acting out the first one. Adam read part of his book aloud and asked Franklin to read a part as fast as he could. They each tried. Franklin made a copy of the passage to turn into a rap. Franklin’s unabashed interest in reading (and performing) is having a positive impact on Adam, just as I’d hoped. A little conversation with Mom revealed that this “I don’t like to read” attitude is new since middle school. I hope that this summer’s workshop will change that attitude (and it seems to be already) and will carry over, or at least not slip as far back, once school starts.

The discussion on Theme today wasn’t terrific. They understood it but the heat was making it difficult for all of us. I used the Lorax as an example to talk about theme as we’d just read it yesterday. Adam came up with some good themes, Franklin seemed distracted but participated when I asked him directly. Then we tried to talk about When You Reach Me. Trying to pull a theme out of this book while half way through is difficult. I thought it was a good compliment to the Lorax to show them that the theme isn’t always obvious.

We got out of the building and found a cooler spot to spend SSR and Read Aloud time. As they read or I read, I asked them to make a note of a scene that they could picture in their mind and that we’d try to draw that scene after. Franklin had Read Aloud first and stopped me to point out three different scenes that he could picture. Adam chose one from his independent reading book.We trudged upstairs, grabbed materials and sat on the floor at the bottom of a stairwell where it was deliciously cool. They both enjoyed this activity and when I asked them why we try to visualize when we read Adam immediately said that it helps understand the book and Franklin said that it helps get into the book.

I truncated the explode the moment activity because of the heat. I talked about slowing a moment down, read an example that I wrote, showed some videos of slow motion (see them here and here and here) and talked about real-time and being able to slow it down as you write. I’d like to come back to it because I think it is fun and connect back to imagery.
Lastly they worked on their Fake Facebook walls (Adam’s for Hatchet and Franklin‘s for Middle School, The Worst Years of My Life -he hasn’t had as much time as Adam to work on it) and finished reading A Circle of Friends. Once both of the boys had finished going through A Circle of Friends and talking about each page I went through and put each of their sticky notes containing the brief description they’d given me together on each page. This way they can go through and see what the other came up with and collaboratively choose one or edit them together or come up with something else.

We headed back to the room so that Franklin could perform the poem he’d picked. He did a reading of the title poem from Falling Up to which he added some actions. Then he read another. Looking at the book it looked like he had marked a couple of poems. Back inside Adam shared (as I mentioned already) and while Franklin was transcribing the passage Adam looked at A Circle of Friends and a conversation sprung up between them “How did you know it was money? I thought it was a book!” They were discussing the process in which they made meaning of the images! It was brilliant. Then Franklin took the book and went through and narrated a story to it that was very good, his delivery is dramatic and ‘serious’, the vocabulary he chose and the way he crafted the sentences made it sound like there were words in the book he was reading instead of coming up with them right then.

I’m feeling pretty good about the project. I think that the boys will work well together and they will question each other’s choices in a productive way. I’m excited to get started on the next step.

Class Eleven – “Click”


Today we started with a discussion of Characterization. We made a list of all the ways we can learn about a character.

  • The book can describe or tell us about the character
  • What the character says
  • What the character does
  • What others say about the character
  • The thoughts of the character
    Cover of "The Lorax (Classic Seuss)"

    Cover of The Lorax (Classic Seuss)

Then I read Dr. Seuss‘, The Lorax (one of my favorites) and I asked Franklin and Adam to stop me when we learned something about the character. Each of them stopped me once but then seemed a bit sleepy so I started asking them questions [Why don’t we ever see the Oncler’s face? What does it mean to be described as “mossy”? What kind of ‘person’ is the Oncler?]. Franklin came up with some very imaginative answers that left Adam and I laughing.

It was about a thousand degrees today so I tried to keep us outside as much as possible. We went out and Franklin SSR’ed and Adam and I started looking at A Circle of Friends, by Giora Carmi. This is a wordless picture book. My goal was to have the students look at the pictures and come up with the story but also to explain their choices. Adam had heard of “Inferring” but didn’t know what it was. I described it as taking the information provided and making an educated guess. We started through the book and on each page I placed a sticky note bearing what Adam said was happening. There is a picture of a man sleeping on a bench, he said it was a homeless man, when I asked him “Why?” he provided all the clues that the picture provided – I pointed out that he had just inferred, and in fact he does it all the time without knowing what it’s called. Later I did this same activity with Franklin (without showing him Adam’s work). I skipped the discussion on Inference. My reasoning is that Franklin was already a little antsy and I didn’t want to lose him with the conversation so we dove into the book. His story was similar to what Adam came up with, but he provided more depth. He talked more about the feelings of the characters and was outraged that the man wasted crumbs of muffin on birds.

My goal is to have the boys work collaboratively to come up with text for A Circle of Friends. To talk about the relationship between text and words we began to read Owl Moon. Before we started I told them the purpose for reading and talked about how the picture won’t contain everything mentioned in words and the words won’t contain everything pictured, but together they create a larger image and meaning. As I read we talked about what was pictured, either in images or words, and what was included in the words or images that did not appear in the other. I referred back often to our project of adding text; I really wanted to make the point that the images don’t limit the text and visa-versa. As a lover of language and photography (and photographer)  this relationship is fascinating to me and something on which I could spend a great deal of time.

Today went really well. I didn’t feel rushed this morning when I was setting up and getting ready. Everything flowed together very nicely. We ate cupcakes and sang Happy Birthday to another student. The hectic feeling of planning and execution has passed and everything seems to have clicked. I don’t know if it will feel that way tomorrow but I will bask in it today. The boys are comfortable with me, each other, and what we’re doing and that comfort level is a big part of the feeling I got today. I felt that the inference discussion connected particularly with Adam and the text-image relationship concept made an impact on Franklin. Of course the proof will be tomorrow when we continue the work and see what they remember.

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